The impact of assistive technology on burden and psychological well‐being in informal caregivers of people with dementia (ATTILA Study)

Davies, Anna, Brini, Stefano, Hirani, Shashivadan, Gathercole, Rebecca, Forsyth, Kirsty, Henderson, Catherine, Bradley, Rosie, Davies, Lucy, Dunk, Barbara, Harper, Emma, Lam, Natalie, Pank, Lynn, Leroi, Iracema, Woolham, John, Fox, Chris, O'Brien, John, Bateman, Andrew, Poland, Fiona, Bentham, Pete, Burns, Alistar, Gray, Richard, Knapp, Martin, Talbot, Emma, Hooper, Emma, Winson, Rachel, Scutt, Bethany, Ordonez, Victoria, Nunn, Samantha, Lavelle, Grace, Howard, Robert and Newman, Stanton (2020) The impact of assistive technology on burden and psychological well‐being in informal caregivers of people with dementia (ATTILA Study). Alzheimer's and Dementia: Translational Research and Clinical Interventions, 6 (1). e12064.

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1002/trc2.12064

Abstract

Introduction: Assistive technology and telecare (ATT) may alleviate psychological burden in informal caregivers of people with dementia. This study assessed the impact of ATT on informal caregivers’ burden and psychological well‐being.

Methods: Individuals with dementia and their informal caregivers were recruited to a randomized‐controlled trial assessing effectiveness of ATT. Caregivers were allocated to two groups according to their cared‐for person's randomization to a full or basic package of ATT and were assessed on caregiver burden, state anxiety, and depression. Caregivers’ data from three assessments over 6 months of the trial were analyzed.

Results: No significant between‐ or within‐group differences at any time point on caregivers’ burden, anxiety, and depression levels were found.

Discussion: Full ATT for people with dementia did not impact caregivers’ psychological outcomes compared to basic ATT. The length of follow up was restricted to 6 months.

Item Type: Article
Journal / Publication Title: Alzheimer's and Dementia: Translational Research and Clinical Interventions
Publisher: Wiley Open Access
ISSN: 2352-8737
Departments: Institute of Health > Urgent and Primary Care
Additional Information: This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Depositing User: Christian Stretton
Date Deposited: 01 Feb 2021 10:34
Last Modified: 05 Aug 2022 10:45
URI: https://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/5913

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