Book review: Astrology and the seventeenth-century mind: William Lilly and the language of the stars

Poole, Robert (1997) Book review: Astrology and the seventeenth-century mind: William Lilly and the language of the stars. History, 82 (268). pp. 693-694.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Available under License CC BY-NC

Download (235kB) | Preview
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-229X.00056

Abstract

'Just what was William Lilly so good at?' asks Ann Geneva near the start of this interesting book. It is a question well worth the asking, for William Lilly's almanacs were one of the publishing phenomena of the Civil War period, selling in their tens of thousands to a public anxious for signs of what was to come, and supported by a parliament well aware of the value of works which declared that the heavens proclaimed the downfall of the king. In the war for hearts and minds, Lilly was parliament's secret weapon, 'the first astrological republican'. Moreover, not only did he write his predictions in an accessible way, he also explained his methods, breaking the magicians' code. He even issued a manual, Christian Astrology, in 1647. Lilly's combination of evangelicalism and predictive success did more than anything to popularize the arcane craft of astrology.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: History
Publisher: Wiley
ISSN: 1468-229X
Departments: Humanities
Additional Information: Robert Poole reviews the book 'Astrology and the seventeenth-century mind: William Lilly and the language of the stars', by Ann Geneva. Manchester University Press. 1995.
Depositing User: Insight Administrator
Date Deposited: 30 Nov 2010 15:57
Last Modified: 25 Oct 2018 12:54
URI: http://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/727

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year



Downloads each year

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item