The experience of design and delivery of simulated activity in the field of health at a higher education institution: reflections and recommendations

Aubrey, Claire, Morris, Karen and Drude, Finn (2022) The experience of design and delivery of simulated activity in the field of health at a higher education institution: reflections and recommendations. In: NET 2022 Conference (Networking for Education in Healthcare), 6-7 September 2022, Lancaster University, UK. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Promotional abstract: It has been the role of the newly created Health Simulation Team at the University of Cumbria to investigate the efficacy of various types of simulation, as well as to explore a robust design process, placing content at the core, rather than technology. Through this experiential self-enquiry, this presentation will draw initial conclusions and recommendations for educators and practice areas in the design and delivery of their own simulated activity. Ideas presented will initiate a wider dialogue around the use of simulation and its application in other educational settings.

Key concepts to be addressed, including, where possible, the international relevance: Successful simulation is immersive, interactive and realistic (Gaba, 2004). There is a good deal of emerging evidence to support its usefulness in both didactic and practical terms, even providing alternative and innovative practice experience. Simulation can be presented in many ways, from no-tech role play to high-tech virtual reality (Persson, 2017). There is currently limited research around a formal design and delivery process of simulation, particularly in response to replicating healthcare practice (Chu et al., 2019). This presentation will therefore draw on the reflections of staff within the Health Simulation faculty, to explore their experiences of designing, delivering, and evaluating simulated activity in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

Aim(s)/focus: Through this experiential discussion, the presentation will draw initial conclusions and recommendations for educators and practice areas in the design and delivery of their own simulated activity. Ideas presented will initiate a wider dialogue around the use of simulation and its application in other educational settings.

Evidence base and literature informing the arguments: Successful simulation is immersive, interactive and realistic (Gaba, 2004). There is a good deal of emerging evidence to support its usefulness in both didactic and practical terms, even providing alternative and innovative practice experience. Simulation can be presented in many ways, from no-tech role play to high-tech virtual reality (Persson, 2017). There is currently limited research around a formal design and delivery process of simulation, particularly in response to replicating healthcare practice (Chu et al., 2019).

Issues for debate: This will form an initial self-enquiry into the emerging design process of simulation at a HEI, including the challenges and barriers, as well as the successes. It will reflect on the continuous liaison with stakeholders, as well as the ongoing process of evaluation in order to maintain focus, quality and efficacy.

Three key points to indicate how your work contributes to knowledge development within the selected theme: This will add to the body of research around simulation from a higher education institute perspective, but with a new focus on a newly formed team building a collection of innovative and sometimes bespoke simulation material, and will examine simulation from an interprofessional perspective.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Departments: Institute of Health > Medical Sciences
Depositing User: Anna Lupton
Date Deposited: 14 Sep 2022 12:37
Last Modified: 14 Sep 2022 12:45
URI: https://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/6586

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