The march to Peterloo: politics and festivity in late Georgian England

Poole, Robert (2006) The march to Peterloo: politics and festivity in late Georgian England. Past and Present, 192 (1). pp. 109-153. Full text not available from this repository.

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1093/pastj/gtl006

Abstract

In March 1820 Henry Hunt, Samuel Bamford and others were on trial at York assizes for conspiracy and sedition in connection with the Manchester reform meeting of Monday 16 August 1819 — the meeting which had ended in the ‘Peterloo massacre’. Bamford defended himself, and his line of defence at times puzzled the judge. Bamford’s star witness was James Dyson, a neighbour from Middleton. Dyson’s description of the march as a kind of festive village outing seemed impossible to reconcile with the picture of a threatening military-style descent on Manchester which the prosecution had presented.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Past and Present
Publisher: Oxford University Press for Past and Present Society
ISSN: 1477-464X
Departments: Faculty of Education, Arts and Business > Institute of the Arts > Humanities
Pre 2016 Departments: Faculty of Education, Arts and Business > Arts and Humanities
Depositing User: Insight Administrator
Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2010 11:59
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2017 16:21
URI: http://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/559

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