The effects of exergaming on pain, postural control, technology acceptance and flow experience, in older people with chronic musculoskeletal pain: a randomised controlled trial.

Ditchburn, Jae-Llane, Van Schaik, Paul, MacSween, Alasdair, Dixon, John and Martin, Denis (2019) The effects of exergaming on pain, postural control, technology acceptance and flow experience, in older people with chronic musculoskeletal pain: a randomised controlled trial. BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation . (Submitted to Publisher)

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Abstract

Background: Previous studies of exergaming for older people have reported mixed findings, but, overall, there is a broad indication of potential benefit. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of exergaming, comparing the Interactive Rehabilitation and Exercise System (IREX®) with traditional gym-based exercise with no virtual stimuli (TGB), on pain, postural control, technology acceptance and flow experience in older people with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

Methods: 54 older adults (age: 71 ± 5 years) with chronic musculoskeletal pain were randomised (stratified, blind card) to one of two groups: (a) completed exergaming using IREX® and (b) completed TGB exercise. Both groups completed two, 40-minute, exercise sessions (matched for intensity, duration and movement patterns) a week for six weeks. The sensory, emotional and motivational dimension of pain was measured using the Multidimensional Affect and Pain Survey (MAPS) questionnaire and intensity, with a numeric rating scale. Postural Control was measured as sway using a Kistler™ force platform. Technology acceptance was measured with the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) and flow experience with the Flow State Scale (FSS) questionnaires. Rating of Perceived Exertion (BORG RPE) and HR were also recorded during all sessions.

Results: There were no significant differences in objective or subjective measures of physical demand and hence the exercise groups were matched. There were significant improvements in pain and balance in the exergaming group compared to the TGB group. Although significant intervention effects on technology acceptance were found in social influence and behavioural intention in the TBG group, both groups demonstrated significant increases in all of the technology acceptance variables over time. In terms of flow experience, concentration at task was significantly influenced in the TGB group and significant increases in flow experience variables were observed in both groups (TGB and exergaming).

Conclusion: Exergaming has potential to alleviate pain and improve balance in older people with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Both forms of exercise are acceptable, intrinsically motivating and show evidence of benefit to older people with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

Item Type: Article
Journal / Publication Title: BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
Publisher: BMC
Departments: Outdoor Studies
Depositing User: Christian Stretton
Date Deposited: 07 Jan 2020 10:28
Last Modified: 08 Feb 2020 11:38
URI: http://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/5309

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