Youth work and schools: exploring non-formal learning in a formal school environment

Mills, Nicky (2017) Youth work and schools: exploring non-formal learning in a formal school environment. Masters dissertation, University of Cumbria. Item availability may be restricted.

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Abstract

The profession of youth work is changing, moving from open access youth work to targeted work. In the face of this change, this study seeks to understand why youth work and nonformal learning are successful developmental processes for young people and if situated in the environment of a school, these successes can be replicated. This research follows a postpositivist methodological approach based on a case study of a school and youth club at the same location. Qualitative methods were used for the research including two focus groups, an unstructured interview and creative approaches. A process of inductive reasoning was used to analyse the data. Findings show that forming positive relationships is of primary importance in youth work, enabling a sharing of power between young people and youth workers leading to productive learning experiences. Data reveals that for non-formal youth work to be of greater benefit to young people and to the school, the focus must be on building relationships and not on the activity being carried out. To promote the benefits of youth work, this study proposes utilising a process curriculum to demonstrate learning. Three conditions emerge from the data as being necessary for successful youth work delivery in a school; firstly, youth workers are to be employed by an external agency; secondly, there needs to be a neutral space in the school to carry out youth work practice; and lastly, there needs to be full support from the senior management team to enable effective partnership working.

Item Type: Thesis/Dissertation (Masters)
Departments: Outdoor Studies
Additional Information: Dissertation presented in part fulfilment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Arts in Development Training, University of Cumbria, 2017.
Depositing User: Anna Lupton
Date Deposited: 25 Jul 2019 09:02
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2019 17:44
URI: http://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/5028

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