Passive movement training improves one-legged stance but no other measure of functional ability in older females

Maslivec, Amy, Bampouras, Theodoros and Dewhurst, Susan (2014) Passive movement training improves one-legged stance but no other measure of functional ability in older females. Journal of Sports Sciences, 32 (sup2). s76-s77.

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2014.968398

Abstract

Physical activity can delay the deleterious effects of ageing. Motorised passive movement gyms, typically marketed at older individuals, use a circuit of machines to passively move the limbs. Little is known, however, about the beneficial effects of passive movement on the functional fitness of older individuals. The aim of the study was (i) to determine whether a 12-week programme at a motorised passive movement gym provided any benefit to the functional fitness of healthy older females and (ii) to compare the functional fitness ability of long-term passive movement gym participants to normative values. With institutional ethical approval, nine healthy females (mean (s) age 73.6 (6.1) years), new recruits to a motorised passive movement gym, were measured for functional fitness pre- and 12 weeks post-initiation of the passive gym programme. A total of 13 females (aged 76.0 (6.7) years) acted as a control group. Between group comparisons were conducted using Mann–Whitney U test. Pre- to post- programme comparisons were conducted using Wilcoxon test. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Effect size (ES) was calculated. Additionally, 36 females (aged 71.0 (7.3) years), long-term passive movement gym participants, also completed the functional fitness tests and were compared to age-matched normative values (Rikli and Jones, 1999, Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 7, 162–181). Measurements of functional fitness were one-legged stance, timed 8-foot up-and-go, chair stand, handgrip, chair sit-and-reach and back scratch. Performance in the timed 8-foot up-and-go, chair stand, handgrip, chair sit-and-reach and back scratch did not change following the 12-week programme; however, the one-legged stance duration increased from 11.2 ± 8.6 s to 16.7 ± 8.5 s (P < 0.01, ES = 0.89). In comparison with the normative data, motorised passive gym participants were considered “above average” for one-legged stance, “average” for chair stand, handgrip, chair sit-and-reach and back scratch while “below average” for timed 8-foot up-and-go. Findings suggest that motorised passive movement can be an effective exercise to improve static balance in older women, but not to improve muscle function, flexibility and mobility. Stimulation of the proprioceptive sensory afferents from the passive movement may have increased kinaesthetic awareness, resulting in an improved static balance. This form of exercise, however, should not be relied upon to train other forms of fitness, as no benefits were seen in the other components of functional ability.

Item Type: Article
Journal / Publication Title: Journal of Sports Sciences
Publisher: Taylor & Francis for British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences
ISSN: 1466-447X
Departments: Sports and Physical Activity
Active Ageing Research Group (AARG)
Additional Information: BASES Conference 2014 Day 2. Posters – Physical Activity for Health D2.P9.
Depositing User: Anna Lupton
Date Deposited: 28 Jun 2019 14:24
Last Modified: 01 Jul 2019 18:41
URI: http://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/4934

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