Frailty is independently associated with worse health-related quality of life in chronic kidney disease: a secondary analysis of the Frailty Assessment in Chronic Kidney Disease study

Nixon, Andrew C., Bampouras, Theodoros, Pendleton, Neil, Mitra, Sandip, Brady, Mark E. and Dhaygude, Ajay P. (2019) Frailty is independently associated with worse health-related quality of life in chronic kidney disease: a secondary analysis of the Frailty Assessment in Chronic Kidney Disease study. Clinical Kidney Journal .

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1093/ckj/sfz038

Abstract

Background: Understanding how frailty affects health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in those with chronic kidney disease (CKD) could assist in the development of management strategies to improve outcomes for this vulnerable patient group. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between frailty and HRQOL in patients with CKD Stages 4 and 5 (G4–5) and those established on haemodialysis (G5D).

Methods: Ninety participants with dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD G4–5D) were recruited between December 2016 and December 2017. Frailty was assessed using the Frailty Phenotype, which included assessments of unintentional weight loss, weakness (handgrip strength), slowness (walking speed), physical activity and self-perceived exhaustion. HRQOL was assessed using the RAND 36-Item Health Survey Version 1.0 (SF-36).

Results: Nineteen (21%) patients were categorized as frail. Frailty, when adjusted for age, gender, dialysis dependence and comorbidity, had a significant effect on five of the eight SF-36 domains: physical functioning, role limitations due to emotional problems, energy/fatigue, social functioning and pain. Regression modelling best explained the variation in the physical functioning domain (adj. R2 = 0.27, P < 0.001), with frailty leading to a 26-point lower score. Exhaustion was the only Frailty Phenotype component that had a significant effect on scores across all SF-36 domains.

Conclusions: Frailty is independently associated with worse HRQOL in patients with CKD G4–5D, with self-perceived exhaustion being the most significant Frailty Phenotype component contributing to HRQOL. Efforts should be made to identify frail patients with CKD so that management strategies can be offered that aim to improve morbidity, mortality and patient-reported outcomes, including HRQOL and fatigue.

Item Type: Article
Journal / Publication Title: Clinical Kidney Journal
Publisher: Oxford University Press for European Renal Association - European Dialysis and Transplant Association
ISSN: 2048-8513
Departments: Active Ageing Research Group (AARG)
Depositing User: Insight Administrator
SWORD Depositor: Insight Administrator
Date Deposited: 09 May 2019 10:50
Last Modified: 09 May 2019 10:51
URI: http://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/4744

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