Countering epistemological exclusion through critical-ethical research to support social justice: methodological comparisons between Australia and the United Kingdom

Stuart, Kaz (Karen) and Shay, Marnee (2018) Countering epistemological exclusion through critical-ethical research to support social justice: methodological comparisons between Australia and the United Kingdom. In: Reyes, Vicente, Charteris, Jennifer, Nye, Adele and Mavropoulou, Sofia, (eds.) Educational research in the age of Anthropocene. IGI Global, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, pp. 188-210.

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-5225-5317-5.ch009

Abstract

The dominance of neoliberalism in the west such as Australia and the UK and its insistence on impact measurement can lead researchers into an unquestioning adoption of scientific methods of measurement and data collection. We argue that if methods are not appropriate for the participants or context they are likely to reproduce existing societal inequities and positions of marginalisation and powerlessness. The theoretical position for fit-for-purpose research and evaluation tools, and specifically for social science methods is put forward theoretically and substantiated with cases drawn from diverse communities in Australia and the UK. Further, we will use autoethnography to share our experiences to argue that any research or evaluation endeavour should have as many benefits for the participants as for the researchers and wider stakeholders, a measure we argue should be the acid test for research ethics. The implications of these findings for researchers, evaluators, practitioners and policy makers are drawn out.

Item Type: Book Section
Publisher: IGI Global
ISSN: 2326-8905
ISBN: 9781522553175
Departments: Youth & Community Work
Additional Information: Chapter nine within book.
Depositing User: Anna Lupton
Date Deposited: 27 Sep 2018 14:51
Last Modified: 28 Sep 2018 14:51
URI: http://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/4107

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