Children, their world, their history education: the implications of the Cambridge review for primary history

Cooper, Hilary (2018) Children, their world, their history education: the implications of the Cambridge review for primary history. Education 3-13, 46 (6). pp. 615-619. Item availability may be restricted.

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1080/03004279.2018.1483797

Abstract

I am delighted to edit this issue of Education 3-13, which focuses on the implementation of the English National Curriculum for history at Key Stages 1 and 2 (5-11 years old) (DfE 2013 “The National Curriculum in England” www.gov.uk/dfe.nationalcurriculum). It is discussed through the lens of recommendations, which apply specifically to history, in 'Children, Their Lives, Their Education: Final Report and Recommendations of the Cambridge Primary Review' (Alexander 2010 'Children, Their World, Their Education: Final Report and Recommendations of the Cambridge Primary Review. Abingdon: Routledge). This is the most extensive report on primary education in England for 40 years, based on the findings of 28 research surveys, analysing and basing arguments on data collected from an extensive range of sources, including educational organisations, teachers, parents and children from all over England. It combines evidence on recent developments with a vision of how primary education should be. The Cambridge Primary Review Trust (CPRT) which supported schools and promoted a vision for primary education after the publication of the report has now sadly closed down. Nonetheless, the influence of the Cambridge Primary Review remains seminal in the field. Using it as a focus for examining the History curriculum continues its influence and status. In structuring this issue of Education 3-13, contributors were invited to write with a focus on one of the key concepts in the review which are relevant to teaching history in ways which are transforming, and to the National Curriculum for history (DfE 2013 2013 “The National Curriculum in England” www.gov.uk/dfe.nationalcurriculum). The concepts selected were: oracy, creativity, curiosity, excellence, locality, local, national and global links, chronology and cross-curricularity. The following articles discuss recent research in history education, linked to one of these concepts. The National Curriculum for History (2013) is an endangered curriculum. It can be marginalised because of the accountability invested in English and mathematics and so interpreted merely as a transmission of facts. However, the Cambridge Primary Review (CPR) presented pressing arguments for a pedagogy in which history is amongst those subjects regarded as central to the curriculum. It is a powerful reminder that history remains in need of public, professional and political recognition.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Education 3-13
Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge) for Association for the Study of Primary Education (ASPE)
ISSN: 1475-7575
Departments: Early Years and Primary Undergraduate Partnership QG
Depositing User: Insight Administrator
SWORD Depositor: Insight Administrator
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2018 11:15
Last Modified: 03 Nov 2018 06:45
URI: http://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/4059

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