The introduction of the Outcome Assessment and Complexity Collaborative (OACC) suite of measures into a hospice setting: a proposal for changing practice

Adams, Helen (2017) The introduction of the Outcome Assessment and Complexity Collaborative (OACC) suite of measures into a hospice setting: a proposal for changing practice. Masters thesis, University of Cumbria. Item availability may be restricted.

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Abstract

This paper presents a proposal for the introduction of the Outcome Assessment and Complexity Collaborative (OACC) suite of measures into a hospice setting, situated within the north west of England. Hospice care strives to improve the quality of life and wellbeing of patients with a life-shortening illness. Supporting them to live as fully as they can for the treasured time they have left. Hospice care seeks to be accessible to all people who could gain benefit and, aims to meet personal preferences and needs (Hospice UK, 2017). The hospice has a 9 bedded in-patient unit, and a hospice at home service covering both urban and rural areas. Patients with life-shortening conditions are admitted into hospice services for symptom management, respite care and care at the end of life. These services are focussed on enabling patients and families to achieve the quality of life the individual patient expresses as most important to them.

Quality of life is subjective to each individual, the parameters of which usually change dependent upon the circumstances an individual finds themselves in, such as ill health. Equally the quality of care for each individual will be perceived differently according to their needs. Whilst quality of life can be defined on an individual basis, measurement of the outcome of intervention and quality of care proves to be more challenging. The hospice is accountable to patients, communities and commissioners with regard to proving effectiveness of service provision, yet it currently does not have a method of achieving this.

Based on work began in the 1980s, the Outcome Assessment and Complexity Collaborative (OACC) suite of measures offers a holistic approach to assessment, capturing patients’ priorities to inform individualised care planning and, provide tangible data to evidence quality of services delivered. Through networking; visits to other hospices, with OACC assessment processes in use, and attending national presentations and workshops the change agent for this project has achieved a foundation of knowledge, supported by an evidence base. This knowledge has been applied to support the proposal for a structured implementation of the OACC measures within the inpatient unit and hospice at home services. The paper presents the evidence base for the proposal within a literature review. It then provides a critical analysis of the change process, and a plan for implementation, drawing upon theories and frameworks for practice. The paper concludes with an evaluation and dissemination strategy.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Departments: Faculty of Health and Science > Nursing, Health and Professional Practice
Additional Information: Dissertation submitted in part fulfilment for the MSc Advanced Practice (Clinical).
Depositing User: Anna Lupton
Date Deposited: 13 Oct 2017 09:14
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2017 12:49
URI: http://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/3291

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