Evidence based change in practice to support paramedics to provide enhanced care to palliative care patients via the implementation of guidelines, education and improved information sharing in the community

Morris, Claire Louise (2017) Evidence based change in practice to support paramedics to provide enhanced care to palliative care patients via the implementation of guidelines, education and improved information sharing in the community. Masters thesis, University of Cumbria. Item availability may be restricted.

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Abstract

Palliative care seeks to enhance the quality of life of patients and their carers facing incurable conditions (Brady, 2013; Brady, 2016a). However, whilst the number of individuals in the United Kingdom (UK) requiring palliative care is increasing (Caswell et al, 2015), there is reportedly a downward trend in the number of expected deaths at home (Henderson, 2014), despite research indicating this is where the majority of individuals would prefer to die (Spencer, 2015), leading to questions as to why this is occurring (Henderson, 2014). Traditionally, palliative care has not been viewed as a paramedic role (Waldrop et al, 2014), but paramedics play a key role in palliative care (Parkinson, 2014; Lamba et al, 2013), with the clinical decisions they make potentially setting the trajectory for subsequent care (Rogers et al, 2015). Yet, despite paramedics having regular contact with palliative care patients (Munday et al, 2011), paramedics have raised concerns regarding their ability to provide effective palliative care, due to limited guidelines and education, and poor information sharing between healthcare professionals (HCPs) (Lord et al, 2012). This raises concerns that paramedics may be impacting upon the downward trend in home deaths (Henderson, 2014). Due to these issues, this practice change plans to develop and implement palliative care guidelines and education, and improve information sharing between community palliative care providers and one ambulance service trust within the UK. To achieve this, it is recognised that integrated working with community palliative care teams is essential to support enhanced information sharing, to assist paramedic clinical decision making, with the aim of improving the provision of palliative care provided by paramedics. This paper highlights that there are challenges which must be overcome to develop appropriate guidelines, education and integrated working to improve the provision of palliative care (Lord et al, 2012; Natch and van der Meer, 2003; Harrison et al, 2010; Weise et al, 2012; Wilkes, 2014). However, as paramedics are now viewed as mobile healthcare providers (Bradley, 2005), who play a significant role in palliative care (Rogers et al, 2015), it appears essential that this proposal is ultimately realised to ensure patients are appropriately supported to achieve a good death.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Departments: Faculty of Health and Science > Nursing, Health and Professional Practice
Additional Information: Dissertation submitted in part fulfilment for the MSc in Advanced Practice (Clinical).
Depositing User: Anna Lupton
Date Deposited: 11 Oct 2017 11:59
Last Modified: 15 Oct 2017 05:01
URI: http://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/3280

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