Fetal telemedicine pilot: a study of clinical stakeholder acceptance of a tele-ultrasound innovation linking a rural district general hospital with a fetal medicine unit at a major teaching hospital in Northern England

Bidmead, Elaine, Robson, Stephen C., Snaith, Vikki, Lie, Mabel and Marshall, Alison (2016) Fetal telemedicine pilot: a study of clinical stakeholder acceptance of a tele-ultrasound innovation linking a rural district general hospital with a fetal medicine unit at a major teaching hospital in Northern England. In: The British Maternal and Fetal Medicine Society 19th Annual Conference, 30-31 March 2017, Beurs van Berlage, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/1471-0528.14586

Abstract

Introduction: The pilot explored delivery of complex obstetric ultrasound services via videoconferencing. A video link enabled a fetal medicine specialist to synchronously examine ultrasound images captured by sonographers at the DGH and to conduct remote consultations with parents. The study was undertaken to understand the barriers and enablers of technology adoption from the perspectives of clinical stakeholders.

Methods: Adopted from the Stakeholder Empowered Adoption Model developed by the University of Cumbria, commissioners and managers were involved in determining the evidence needed to assist decision making; semi-structured qualitative interviews were then undertaken with six key clinical stakeholders.

Results: The study identified a range of tangible benefits to DGH staff. Sonographers were upskilled; more involved in women’s pregnancies; and had better access to specialist support. Consultants felt better supported and less isolated professionally, resulting in improved management of high risk pregnancies. All clinicians recognised benefits for women of convenience and continuity of care. Potential barriers included: engagement of DGH executive/management; establishing the video-link; interruption of routine practise. Most challenges were overcome within the pilot.

Conclusion: Fetal ultrasound via telemedicine has enhanced maternity provision at the DGH. Whilst staff acceptance is an identified barrier to adoption of telehealth, tangible benefits are known enablers. In this instance the identification of tangible early benefits for patients and staff influenced staff acceptance.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
Journal or Publication Title: BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Publisher: Wiley
ISSN: 1471-0528
Departments: Cumbrian Centre for Health Technologies
Additional Information: Poster abstract no. P.FM.13.
Depositing User: Elaine Bidmead
Date Deposited: 20 Sep 2017 14:54
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2017 17:49
URI: http://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/3179

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