Golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) restoration in the Lake District National Park; an investigation of public demand and economic benefits

Ramsey, Andrew D., Nevin, Owen and Armstrong, Roy (2008) Golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) restoration in the Lake District National Park; an investigation of public demand and economic benefits. In: Zoological Society of London Symposium: Avian Reintroduction Biology, 8-9 May 2008, ZSL Meeting Rooms, The Zoological Society of London, Regents Park, London. Full text not available from this repository.

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Abstract

The Lake District National Park is the home of England’s only resident golden eagle, located on the hillside above Haweswater, west of Shap. Formerly a pair, until 2004 when the female disappeared, the male continues to display at the site. A questionnaire was conducted with tourists in Windermere at the heart of the Lake District National Park. Respondents were asked for their opinion regarding the restoration of a range of species. Respondents were largely in favour of restoration. Over 95% of respondents were in favour of a reintroduction of golden eagles, with 44% of respondents putting golden eagle as their top priority for restoration. There are both economic and legislative incentives for reintroduction. The nearby osprey viewing site at Dodd Wood brings in an estimated £2million per annum to the local economy. Eagle restoration has the potential to bring in additional visitors to the area drawing them away from the traditional Lake District honey-pots. In addition to meeting international and European commitments to restoration, the project would also meet local development agency targets towards sustainable tourism. What remains unclear at this time is the carrying capacity for golden eagles in the Lake District and surrounding countryside, and the attitude of other stakeholders such as hill farmers. However, there appears to be enormous potential for restoration of an iconic species with the potential funding outside of the normal conservation channels.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
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Departments: Faculty of Health and Science > Science, Natural Resources and Outdoor Studies > Forestry, Conservation & Applied Science
Depositing User: Insight Administrator
Date Deposited: 19 Jan 2012 15:34
Last Modified: 13 Jun 2017 11:39
URI: http://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/1077

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